Miscellaneous Matters & Important Advice About Trees

State of STL Cool Season Turf

Today, 18-November-2018 we find ourselves thawing from a great snowfall. This, along with the October rains has provided our area with very good soil moisture status. Going into late fall and winter with adequate moisture is great for our landscapes. But those damned leaves are complicating clean up efforts! The maples, ashes and hickories have shed their leaves but the pears and oaks are still hanging on. I have the misfortune of living on a side street with dozens of huge 40-year-old pin oaks. The dang things meter out their spent leaves, requiring weekly cleanups all the way through January. I hate pin oaks (more about that later). I spent several hours yesterday literally raking sloppy wet leaves off the street. I shoveled piles onto a tarp with a snow shovel! Plus I used my commercial leaf blower to clean up the leaves underneath a light crust of snow. Turf pros know that you can’t let your winter leaves pile up on cool season grass, lest you kill it 100% next spring! It’s going to be a nice, sunny week with normal temperatures. So get off your ass and get those leaves cleaned up. Mow your yard a few more times, too.

Trees in the Wrong Spot

It annoys the hell out of me when I see redbuds (Cercis canadensis) and dogwoods (Cornus florida) used in hot parking lots. The redbud is certainly more heat tolerant than our native white flowering dogwood, but neither are suited for the desert like conditions in an asphalt parking lot. Its tree abuse! Call the authorities! Redbuds and dogwoods are shade tolerant trees and as such, they are adapted to the understory of our forests, or along the edges of our woods. A good nursery will tell you to avoid planting these small flowering trees on the SW and W sides of your home, where hot afternoon sun causes tremendous stress. Planting on the S side of the house may be OK as long as the site is shaded after 2 PM.

Check out this photo from a local grocery store. These redbuds will be short-lived because of the heat load and the lack of supplemental irrigation. While I enjoy multi-stemmed versions of the redbud, it’s not really appropriate for a parking lot because low hanging branches present an eye-injury hazard to customers. This is dumb all around. The landscape architect that planned this job should be tarred and feathered. Dumb ass!

Redbud in hot parking lot.jpg

You might wonder what a better alternative would be in this hell hole. Believe it or not, the ginkgo (Gingko biloba) would be an excellent choice because they’re great street trees. An upright or pyramidal selection would be outstanding. Because of limited soil volume a slow-growing tree would fair better than a rapidly growing tree. The European beech (Carpinus betulus) would also be great here.

No Planting Under Red Maples

Lots of folks like to plant directly underneath their shade trees. It certainly won’t hurt the tree, but there are factors to consider. The first factor contributing to success or failure is the tree species. Shallow rooted trees like the river birch, silver maple or red maple will limit your long-term success. Take a look at the roots under this red maple.

Maple Roots Desert.jpg

Even if you chopped holes with a mattock or ax, whatever you plant beneath this won’t be able to compete with those roots for water and nutrients. You’re best just to apply a light coat of mulch. 2 inches of mulch is MORE than enough.

Here’s a shot of some sickly daffodil bulbs that were planted several years ago. They’re alive but they can’t produce enough energy to make a flower.

Bad Idea

They were probably OK the very first spring, but started to decline right after that. The moral of the story is to avoid planting underneath shallow rooted trees, including but not limited to red maples, silver maples, Japanese maples, sweetgums and river birches.

Please shoot your questions or comments to me about these issues. Feel free to disagree!

Trav

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOW is Prime Time to Plant a Flowering Crabapple

For those of you wanting a nice flowering tree for full sun exposure, the flowering crabapple is hard to beat, but ONLY if you pick out the best cultivars. There are hundreds of varieties and cultivars of the crabapple, and most of them are actually quite crappy. You read that right–crappy! The inferior selections suffer from three bad foliar diseases (rust, scab and mildew) and some are susceptible to a virtually uncontrollable bacterial disease (fireblight). Too many of them have fruit that is too large for birds to consume, resulting in nasty messes and rotten fruits all over the sidewalk, driveway and patios. Those rotten fruits draw them dang yellow jackets, too. Horrible!

Too many homeowners abuse redbuds and dogwoods by planting them in a hot, sunny location (southwest, west and northwest exposures). Dogwoods abhor hot afternoon sun (3 to 7 PM) while redbuds can handle a bit more, but they won’t thrive with intense PM sun. Instead of planting these “woodland understory” species, plant a crabapple! Some crabs stay nice and small, while others can reach 30 ft tall and wide.

Here’s what you need to do. Visit the nurseries NOW. First, look for trees that still have leaves on them. If the leaves aren’t present, assume they suffered from disease and have dropped off. The owner of the nursery may try to tell you that simple water stress/drought is the reason for a lack of leaves, but don’t buy that line of B-S. Next, look for small fruits—about the size of a pea or just slightly larger. Marble-sized fruits are too big for most songbirds to consume. Finally, inspect the base of the tree for an absence of root suckers. It’s ok to have a sucker or two on the main truck, but NOT from the roots on the top of the root ball. If necessary, try to peel back the burlap on the top of the root ball to ensure that the existing suckers were not pruned of. You can easily feel the woody stubs. Heh now, keep your mind out of the gutter! Rootstock suckers are a symptom of either graft incompatibility or an aggressive rootstock, or both. They will develop all spring and summer long, and thus, make the tree ugly and result in a lot of maintenance headaches for you.